Thursday, July 25, 2013

Playing Tennis When Pregnant


Healthyexerciseandfitness.blogspot.com | Women's Health News
Playing Tennis
Tennis is not for the faint of heart. It demands speed, agility, balance, coordination and stamina. When you envision a pregnant women playing tennis, or any sport, the mental image seems laughable. Though tennis can be strenuous, it's a lot of stop-n-go along with aerobic. Since there is always a risk that a ball may hit your belly, only very well-trained players should play with out caution or more than once or twice a week.


Some mothers can play up to 1 week before the birth of the baby. Others have to stop 2-3 months away from the due date if complications are occuring. The important thing is to listen to your body. -" I played doubles tennis until 5 days before the due date" says Callista of Miami, 33, mother of a 6-week old boy and three older children, -"and I resumed playing 3 weeks postpartum. I played two times a week and paid special attention to my body during the game, as I was very aware of my physical limitations. I didn't chase every ball. There were some moves I wasn't going to make. I was very careful and would never have played singles. Doubles allowed me to catch my breath while relying on my partner."

With her modifications, Callista was able to play almost to term, but most tennis players' stop in the 5th or 6th month as balance and coordination declines. But remember as long as you do play, or anyone dares play with you, slowing down to play "doubles" is a safer bet.

Don't:

- play competitively - keep it fun, there will be plenty of time to beat your partners after you have your baby… - push yourself to return every ball, your opponent will get a few more winners but it's OK, - attempt fast moves, - play on days with a heat index over 85 or in a badly ventilated indoor court,

Do:

- take extended breaks between games, - drink plenty of cold water, - warm up & cool down properly to avoid injury - do lite work-outs to strengthen quads, hamstrings, calves, inner thighs to protect hips, knees and ankles, - stretch after each tennis game and workout (you should be doing this anyway). - to charge up, eat healthy and a sufficient amount of food, and take prenatal vitamins. - listen to your body - if it tells you to stop after 20 minutes then please stop


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Alexandra McCabe is a founder of https://www.fittamamma.com, the healthy pregnancy experts. FittaMamma is a free resource to help women enjoy an active pregnancy with workout videos, recipes and prenatal yoga tips. Here you can find easy to use guides for prenatal exercise for a healthy pregnancy while managing pregnancy weight gain http://bit.ly/14v6YhN